A Smart City Is an Accessible City

Smart City ADA Accessibility

Originally published on The Atlantic

A new breed of accessibility apps can make life easier for people with disabilities. They can also make it harder.

Excerpt:

A group gathers on a Nashville street corner, some rolling in wheelchairs and others walking. They have arrived holding their smartphones and make friendly chatter while a coordinator helps them log in to an app. Dispersing in small groups, they examine restaurants, cafes, and shops, looking for features signaling that disability is welcome there: a parking sign with the International Symbol of Access, a wheelchair ramp, an automatic front door, a wide bathroom stall with grab bars, braille text, low-flicker lighting, glare-free floors, scent-free soap. The groups use the app to document and rate these features. Once submitted, the information accumulates in a database that others can use to find accessible locations.

Excerpt:

But even if all these problems were solved, digital-accessibility apps still pose one final threat to disability advocacy in urban environments. Apps can make cities more navigable, but they do not change the material features of that environment. Most of the time, they record the current conditions in the built environment rather than advocate for better ones. Before apps came on the scene, disability activists used mapping to catalog injustices and to imagine alternative futures: new environments in which accessibility was the norm, rather than the exception. Contemporary projects should incorporate that lesson, too. By incorporating knowledge from broad groups of people with disabilities, digital mapping could do more than just record the world as it is today. It could also drive political, design, and policy improvements. After all, to deserve the name, a smart city ought to be a better city, not just a more technological one.

ADA Committee Chairpersons for KMA Announced

Kiosk Manufacturer Association with ADA, NRF, and Emergency Kiosk updates

EASTLAKE, Colo.Oct. 8, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — The Kiosk Manufacturer Association (aka KMA) is pleased to announce the appointments of inaugural Chairpersons for the ADA and Accessibility Committee.

Laura Miller of KioWare (https://kioware.com) and Randy Amundson of Frank Mayer, Inc. (https://frankmayer.com) have been named as Co-Chairperson for the ADA and Accessibility Committee. Both Laura and Randy have extensive experience in both software and hardware aspects of self-service technology and how assistive technology best serves the public.

The Kiosk ADA and Accessibility Committee includes:

As of 2015, according to U.S. Census surveys, over 12% of all persons in the United States have some type of disability and that number is growing.

To help address disabilities and the ADA regulations, the KMA has recently released a proposed framework for Voice Recognition and Speech Command.  Working with the U.S. Access Board directly, the KMA is hopeful that a proposed Code-of-Practice can be adopted for this type of assistive technology. Public comment and working group participation is encouraged and only requires expertise and experience.

This is intended for global adoption with much of the input by the UK’s Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB).

In another related public service, the KMA recently released a white paper describing emergency alert and detection technologies for public terminals for use in education, government, retail, transportation, hospitality and entertainment segments. Smart City and smart transportation are target markets. Mission critical public safety tools are the proposed end solution.

The purpose of the document is to define how Wayfinding Technology, Digital Signage and Kiosks can be networked and used to detect and/or prevent active shooter and mass casualty attacks and expedite the response of Law Enforcement and Emergency Services First Responders to catastrophic events in large public venues. We focus on several of the most respected technology providers in the industry and how they would each play a critical role as foundational partners to bring a combined solution to market.

The KMA has joined as a member of the National Retail Federation in order to help communicate education and issues on self-service kiosk technology. The most public iteration of this technology is in the QSR or Fast Casual segment where companies such as McDonalds and Wendy’s have chosen to adopt in order to serve all of their customers as they wish to be served.

In January 2019 in New York, the KMA will be exhibiting on the main floor of NRF’s Big Show and will be accepting members from providers to deployers. An Advisory Panel of companies deploying self-service which can provide their unique perspective on all of the above issues is the objective.

Kiosk Hall of Fame – we are now taking nominations for hall of fame candidates. Marsha Mazz of U.S. Access Board, John Glitsos of FirstWave and Dave Heyliger of Rocky Mountain Multimedia are the initial candidates. See https://kioskindustry.org/kiosk-about/kiosk-hall-fame/

For more information on all of these items, visit https://kioskindustry.org the communication site for the KMA. You can also contact Craig Keefner the manager at [email protected]

We want to thank our supporting sponsors:

Olea Kiosks – https://www.olea.com
KioWare – https://kioware.com
iPadKiosks – https://www.ipadkiosks.com/
Pyramid – https://www.pyramid-computer.com/home.html
KIOSK – https://www.kiosk.com/
Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc. – https://www.frankmayer.com/
Nanonation — https://www.nanonation.net/
Turnkey Kiosks — http://www.turnkeykiosks.com/
22Miles — http://www.22miles.com/
ZIVELO — http://www.zivelo.com/kiorg/
Dynatouch — https://www.dynatouch.com/
Qwick Media — https://www.qwickmedia.com/
OptConnect — http://www.optconnect.com/
PROVISIO – https://www.provisio.com/
ARCA — https://www.arca.com/
Storm Interface — http://www.storm-interface.com/
Peerless AV — https://kioskindustry.org/feature/peerless-av-kiosks/
CSA — http://www.csakiosk.com/
Mimo Monitors — https://www.mimomonitors.com/
OTI Global — https://www.otiglobal.com/cashless_payment_systems/otikiosk/

“Satellite” websites include RetailSystems.org, Selfservice.io and ThinClient.org.
We are hosted at Rackspace, the premier hosting solution (especially during Prime Day). Last month we had 35,000 unique visitors, last 30 days Cloudflare humans = 28,500
Join our LinkedIn Group with over 1600 members.

Related Images

voice-recognition-and-speech.jpg 
Voice recognition and Speech Command 
Framework for latest technologies and how to best incorporate into self-service.

voice-icon.png 
Voice icon 
Informing users of voice operation options

sound-adjustment.png 
Sound Adjustment 
Tactile discernible technology

emergency-kiosks.jpg 
Emergency Kiosks 
For shooter detection and more detection by wayfinding systems in large people venue.

Related Links

Kiosk Manufacturer Association

Kiosk Industry Group

SOURCE Kiosk Manufacturer Association

Related Links

https://kma.global

Android Kiosk Software Supports ADA Assistive

NEW to KioWare for Android – Support Added for Storm Assistive Technology Products

“Accessibility should be a strong consideration for any kiosk deployment. With this release, both KioWare for Windows and KioWare for Android support the heavily tested and well-respected Storm ATP suite of keypads, keyboards & other accessibility products.”  ~ Laura Miller of KioWare.

KIosk Software AndroidKioWare has released a new version of KioWare for Android kiosk software supporting Storm Assistive Technology Products such as the Nav-Pad, Nav-Bar and AudioNav. KioWare kiosk software products lock down your device into kiosk mode, turning your tablet into a secure kiosk or purposed device for self-service, digital signage, or mobile device management deployments.

Kiosk Accessibility Made Easy

Storm Interface KioskVersion 3.16 of KioWare Basic & KioWare Full for Android now includes support for Storm’s ATP devices. These ADA compliant devices allow users with impaired vision, reading difficulties or impaired fine motor skills to navigate through menus or directories that would typically be presented on a visual display or touch screen. They are designed to provide a tactile/audio interface for any accessible self-service application. Devices supported include the Nav-Pad, Nav-Bar and AudioNav. KioWare for Android offers out of the box compatibility for those that want to make their Android self-service or purposed device experience accessible. Prior to this integration, devices running the Android OS were quite limited in their ability to provide an accessible self-service solution.

Additional New Features and Improvements

Improved Provisioning

  • KioWare for Android 3.16 has also added features to improve the ability to provision Android devices. Android devices may now be provisioned via a USB storage device. Provisioning support has also been added for running shell scripts.

Secure File Browser

  • A secure file browser has been added to allow users to open a file browser and select a file to upload. With new security features, users can be restricted to browse only allowed files and folders on the file system. New functionality includes the ability for users to take new photos and videos or browse this file system for existing files.

Multiple Exit Passcodes & Actions

  • Different exit passcodes can now be used to call different exit actions. This allows for actions to be taken based on the exit passcode entered. Deployers can vary permissions based on user need.

Reboot Schedule Management

  • Reboot schedules can now be used on devices that are rooted.

View all updates to KioWare for Android version 3.16 here.

News from the U.S. Access Board – May/ June 2018

Access Board logoAccess Currents 
News from the U.S. Access Board  •  May/ June 2018

Access Board Holds Town Hall Meeting in Phoenix

Board members and staff at the Phoenix town hall meetingThe Access Board held a town hall meeting in Phoenix on May 23 that featured presentations by local speakers on various topics and a public “open mic” forum. It was held at Ability360, a Center for Independent Living. Board Vice Chair Karen Tamley and Executive Director David Capozzi opened the meeting with introductions and an overview of the Board and its work.

The first two speakers addressed access for people with heightened sensitivites to chemicals and electromagnetic fields. Dr. Ann McCampbell, Co-Chair of the Multiple Chemical Sensitivities Task Force of New Mexico, described the debilitating physical reactions experienced by those with an acute sensitivity to various chemicals in the environment, aslo known as Multiple Chemical Sensititvites (MCS). These include chemicals used in fragrances, personal care products, deodorizers, cleaners, pesticides, wall and floor coverings, and building materials. Dr. McCampbell, who has had MCS for almost 30 years, also called attention to sensitivity to electromagnetism from cell phones, security equipment, utility meters, florescent lighting, and other sources. She noted that the prevalence of Electromagnetic Hypersensitivity (EHS) appears to be increasing.

Susan Molloy, M.A., an advocate for people with MCS and environmental illness for 35 years, discussed design recommendations that can improve access for people with MCS. These include installing fresh-air ventilation systems and operable windows, allowing more natural light, avoiding carpet, and pesticide-free landscaping. To improve access for people with EHS, smart meters should be avoided or shielded. Molloy called attenion to an earlier project on indoor environmental quality that was conducted by the National Institute of Building Sciences with funding from the Access Board. She outlined findings and recommendations from the project, which are provided in a report that is avaialble on the Board’s website.

The following presentations addressed ADA compliance in the cities of Phoenix and Tempe. Phoenix ADA Coorindator Peter Fischer reviewed recent initiatives by the city to enhance accessibility under its ADA Compliance Program. He noted that the city regularly surveys facilities for compliance with the ADA and that transition plans are continuously updated to reflect city projects and programs. Several Phoenix tranportation departments have undertaken transition plans, including a city-wide program to install curb ramps and accessible pedestrian signals. Last year, over 2,000 curb ramps were replaced. Other city initiatives include a new committee on integrating accessibility in emergency planning and response, an annual awards accessibility showcase, and a “Save Our Space” campaign that enlists volunteers to help enforce accessible parking.

Michele Stokes, an ADA Compliance Specialist with the Tempe Office of Strategic Management and Diversity, noted an online resource the city has launched to collect data on accessibility issues on city property for self-evaluations and tranisiton planning. It includes a newly launched interactive map with data from digital surveys of sidewalks, curb ramps, cross walks, bus stops and pedestrian signals that will help city planners with transition planning. The surveys collect data on running and cross slopes, changes in level, such as joint heavings, surface gaps, and other features along with geographic coordinates. The city also allows the public to report access issues online and offers other resources on local accessibility.

The final speaker, Bob Hazlett of the Maricopa Association of Governments, addressed autonomous vehicles and opportunities they may offer people with disablitities, including those with vision impairments. He noted that a lot of testing of driverless vehicles is done in Arizona which is becoming known as the place “where self-driving vehicles go to learn.” While it is not known when autonomous vehicles may fully take to the road, the potential impacts on public policy and planning at the local level are being assessed, including those pertaining to parking, infrastructure, public transportation, and cybersecurity, among others.

During the public forum that followed, members of the public raised areas where more needs to be done for accessibility. Many urged action to address access for people with MCS and EHS and described how exposure to certain commonly-used chemicals and to elemtromagnetic fields jeopardize their health, limit access to health care, housing, and other services, and lead to isolation. Some commenters submitted information on the subject and endorsed the work of organziations such as the National Center for Environmental Health Strategies.

Other issues noted included the need for entrance doors to be automated, hotel beds that are too high for transfer, access to casinos, and the lack of electronic shopping carts. The Board was urged to do more outreach and training on access to medical care equipment which remains problematic despite new standards the Board issued last year for medical disagnostic equipment.

In addition, concerns were raised about access for people who are deaf or hard of hearing. Several comments focused on the sound quality and availability of assistive listening systems in meeting spaces. They also addressed connectivity issues that impact video remote sign language interpretation in hospitals and the lack of communication access in pharmacies to instructions for taking medications.

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Board to Host Information Meeting on Assembly Areas September 6

assembly iconOn September 6 the Access Board will hold a public forum on accessibility and assembly areas. The day-long event will focus on accessibility issues related to the design of such facilities, including movie theaters, dinner theaters, performing arts centers, lecture halls, grand stands, stadiums, arenas, and other assembly venues. It will offer an open dialogue to review design challenges and identify potential solutions.

“Our goal is to bring everyone together to find ways of resolving accessibility issues that are unique to different types of assembly spaces,” states Board Executive Director David Capozzi. “The Board will use this information to enhance the technical assistance and training it provides to the public.”

Persons with disabilities, advocacy groups, designers and architects, trade groups, codes organizations, industry, and other interested parties are welcome to attend. Registration is not required. Additional details, including the agenda, will be posted in coming weeks. This event will be in-person only and will not be streamed online. Direct any questions to Dave Yanchulis at [email protected] or (202) 272-0026 (v), or (202) 272-0027 (TTY).

Information Meeting on Assembly Area Accessibility 
September 6, 9:30 – 5:00 (ET)
Access Board Conference Center
1331 F Street, NW, Suite 800
Washington, D.C.
Note: For the comfort of all participants and to promote a fragrance-free environment, attendees are requested not to use perfume, cologne, or other fragrances.

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Bill Botten Named Board’s Coordinator of Training and Technical Assistance

Bill BottenBill Botten, a long-time Board Accessibility Specialist, has been appointed Training and Technical Assistance Coordinator. In this dual role, he will oversee both the agency’s training program and its provision of technical guidance to the public. The Board regularly provides training on its accessibility guidelines and standards upon request at various events and conferences across the county. It also conducts a monthly webinar series in partnership with National Network of ADA Centers. Botten will field training requests, coordinate educational sessions and webinars, and assign Board staff.

In addition, Botten will manage the Board’s technical assistance program. The Board regularly provides technical guidance on its accessibility guidelines and standards and accessible design through its toll-free help line and by email. Accessibility specialists are available to answer questions on accessibility as it relates to the built environment, outdoor sites, streets and sidewalks, transportation vehicles and vessels, information and communication technology, and medical diagnostic equipment.

Botten has served as an Accessibility Specialist at the Board for 18 years and was active in the development of new guidelines and guidance documents for outdoor developed areas and for recreation facilities. He has trained extensively in these and other areas and is a top-rated and highly-requested presenter.

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Upcoming Board Webinars

laptop with Access Board sealThe next webinar in the Board’s free monthly series will take place July 12 from 2:30 – 4:00 (ET) and will review requirements in the ADA and ABA Accessibility Standards for transportation facilities. Presenters will cover provisions for bus stops and shelters, rail stations, and train stations.

The following webinar on August 2 will feature an open question and answer session. Questions are welcome on the Board’s accessibility guidelines and standards, including those issued under the ADA and ABA, as well as other topics related to the Board’s work.

Visit www.accessibilityonline.org for more information or to register for the webinars. Questions can be submitted in advance of the session or can be posed during the webinar. Webinar attendees can earn continuing education credits. The webinar series is hosted by the ADA National Network in cooperation with the Board. Archived copies of previous Board webinars are available on the site.

Section 508 Best Practices Webinar
The Board also offers a free webinar series on standards issued under Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act which requires access to information and communication technology in the federal sector. The next webinar in this series is scheduled for July 31 from 1:00 to 2:30 (ET) and will address how federal agencies can update policies for the revised 508 Standards. For more details or to register for this or other sessions, visitwww.accessibilityonline.org/cioc-508/schedule. The Section 508 Best Practices Webinar Series is made available by the Accessibility Community of Practice of the CIO Council in partnership with the Board.

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Next Access Board Meeting to Take Place July 11

The Access Board will hold its next meeting July 11 from 1:30 – 3:00 (ET) at the Board’s conference space in downtown Washington, D.C. The public is welcome to attend in person or through a live webcast of the meeting.

A public comment period will be held during the final 15 minutes of the meeting. Those interested in making comments in person or by phone should send an email to Rose Bunales at [email protected] by July 5 with “Access Board meeting – Public Comment” in the subject line. Please include your name, organization, state, and topic of your comment in the body of the message.

Meeting of the U.S. Access Board 
July 11, 1:30 – 3:00
Webcast link: www.access-board.gov/webcast
Access Board Conference Center
1331 F Street, NW, Suite 800
Washington, D.C.
Note: For the comfort of all participants and to promote a fragrance-free environment, attendees are requested not to use perfume, cologne, or other fragrances.

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DOJ Rules for Movie Theater Captioning and Audio Description Take Effect

DOJ sealAs of June 2, movie theaters showing digital movies must provide a means for delivering closed captioning and audio description underrules issued under the ADA by the Department of Justice (DOJ). Issued 18 months ago, the rules supplement provisions in DOJ’s ADA regulations on provision of auxiliary aids and services. Movie theaters that show digital movies equipped with closed captions and audio description must acquire and maintain equipment for displaying captions and transmitting audio description.

Closed captions are displayed individually to patrons with hearing impairments at their seats. Open captioning displayed on the movie screen is not required. Audio description provides additional narration of a movie’s visual elements to patrons with vision impairments and is typically transmitted by infrared or FM systems to wireless headsets. The rule specifies the minimum number of closed captioning and audio description devices that must be provided based on the number of auditoriums in a theater. The rule does not apply to theaters showing analog movies only, nor does it require such theaters to convert to digital projection systems. For further information, visit DOJ’s website or contact its ADA hotline at (800) 514-0301 (v) or (800) 514-3083 (TTY).

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W3C Releases Updated Web Content Accessibility Guidelines

W3C logoOn June 5, the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) released an update of its Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0, a globally recognized, technology-neutral accessibility standard for web content. WCAG 2.1 builds upon guidance developed by W3C’s Web Accessibility Initiative by expanding coverage of mobile device accessibility and enhancing access for people with low vision and who have cognitive or learning disabilities.

“The Board applauds the progress made by the W3C Accessibility Guidelines Working Group in its release of the WCAG 2.1,” said Board Executive Director David Capozzi. “The efforts to broaden the range of disability needs currently addressed by WCAG 2.0 will benefit many individuals who still encounter barriers to accessing the web.”

The Board’s updated Section 508 Standards for information and communication technology in the federal sector reference the WCAG 2.0 and apply it to websites, electronic content, and software. In developing WCAG 2.1, the Accessibility Guidelines Working Group ensured backwards capability so that content meeting WCAG 2.1 also satisfies WCAG 2.0.

W3C’s Web Accessibility Initiative works with organizations around the world to promote accessibility of the Web. It helps ensure that web technologies support access, develops accessibility guidelines and related resources, and promotes harmonization of international standards. For further information, visit www.w3.org/WAI/ or contact Amy van der Hiel, W3C’s Media Relations Coordinator at [email protected] or (617) 253-5628.

Accessibility ADA Committee Formed by Kiosk Manufacturers

KIOSK ADA COMMITTEE & WORKING GROUP

Kiosk Accessibility & Kiosk ADA Committee & ADA Working Group

Kiosk ADA Committee
Meeting with US Access Board – from right – David C., Mike James, Peter and then a bit of Laura (behind Peter)

To assist in formulating some agreed upon kiosk accessibility guidelines and understandings, and also to communicate those guidelines to the appropriate standards body we have an ADA Advisory Board and also an ADA Working Group.  Here is the writeupfrom our Kiosk ADA Committee meeting with the U.S. Access Group in Washington, DC in November 2017.

Our Kiosk ADA Committee Advisory Board includes:

  • Olea Kiosks
  • KIOSK Information Systems
  • Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc.
  • KioWare
  • iPadKiosks
  • TurnKey Kiosks
  • Storm Interface
  • Peerless AV
  • DynaTouch

Our ADA Working Group:

  • Lilitab
  • Olea Kiosks
  • KioWare
  • iPadKiosks
  • Storm Interface
  • Turnkey Kiosks
  • DynaTouch
  • Frank Mayer and Associates, Inc.
  • KIOSK Information Systems
  • Assistra Technology
  • URway Holdings
  • Contributor – ATMIA
  • Contributor – ETA
  • Contributor – Taylor Mounts
  • Contributor – NCR Dundee

Current Agenda:  Reviewing pertinent sections and providing feedback and comments before we meet with US Access Board in November

kiosk accessibility
kiosk accessibility comes in many forms

Kiosk Accessibility Standards:

Here are the sections 402 and 407. Comments appreciated.  Full doc is here. ADA-2017-00395

402 Closed Functionality

402.1 General. ICT with closed functionality shall be operable without requiring the user to attach or install assistive technology other than personal headsets or other audio couplers, and shall conform to 402.

402.2 Speech-Output Enabled. ICT with a display screen shall be speech-output enabled for full and independent use by individuals with vision impairments.

EXCEPTIONS: 1. Variable message signs conforming to 402.5 shall not be required to be speech-output enabled.

2. Speech output shall not be required where ICT display screens only provide status indicators and those indicators conform to 409.

3. Where speech output cannot be supported due to constraints in available memory or processor capability, ICT shall be permitted to conform to 409 in lieu of 402.2.

4. Audible tones shall be permitted instead of speech output where the content of user input is not displayed as entered for security purposes, including, but not limited to, asterisks representing personal identification numbers.

5. Speech output shall not be required for: The machine location; date and time of transaction; customer account number; and the machine identifier or label.

6. Speech output shall not be required for advertisements and other similar information unless they convey information that can be used for the transaction being conducted.Start Printed Page 5838

402.2.1 Information Displayed On-Screen. Speech output shall be provided for all information displayed on-screen.

402.2.2 Transactional Outputs. Where transactional outputs are provided, the speech output shall audibly provide all information necessary to verify a transaction.

402.2.3 Speech Delivery Type and Coordination. Speech output shall be delivered through a mechanism that is readily available to all users, including, but not limited to, an industry standard connector or a telephone handset. Speech shall be recorded or digitized human, or synthesized. Speech output shall be coordinated with information displayed on the screen.

402.2.4 User Control. Speech output for any single function shall be automatically interrupted when a transaction is selected. Speech output shall be capable of being repeated and paused.

402.2.5 Braille Instructions. Where speech output is required by 402.2, braille instructions for initiating the speech mode of operation shall be provided. Braille shall be contracted and shall conform to 36 CFR part 1191, Appendix D, Section 703.3.1.

EXCEPTION: Devices for personal use shall not be required to conform to 402.2.5.

402.3 Volume. ICT that delivers sound, including speech output required by 402.2, shall provide volume control and output amplification conforming to 402.3.

EXCEPTION: ICT conforming to 412.2 shall not be required to conform to 402.3.

402.3.1 Private Listening. Where ICT provides private listening, it shall provide a mode of operation for controlling the volume. Where ICT delivers output by an audio transducer typically held up to the ear, a means for effective magnetic wireless coupling to hearing technologies shall be provided.

402.3.2 Non-private Listening. Where ICT provides non-private listening, incremental volume control shall be provided with output amplification up to a level of at least 65 dB. A function shall be provided to automatically reset the volume to the default level after every use.

402.4 Characters on Display Screens. At least one mode of characters displayed on the screen shall be in a sans serif font. Where ICT does not provide a screen enlargement feature, characters shall be 3/16 inch (4.8 mm) high minimum based on the uppercase letter “I”. Characters shall contrast with their background with either light characters on a dark background or dark characters on a light background.

402.5 Characters on Variable Message Signs. Characters on variable message signs shall conform to section 703.7 Variable Message Signs of ICC A117.1-2009 (incorporated by reference, see 702.6.1).


407 Operable Parts

407.1 General. Where provided, operable parts used in the normal operation of ICT shall conform to 407.

407.2 Contrast. Where provided, keys and controls shall contrast visually from background surfaces. Characters and symbols shall contrast visually from background surfaces with either light characters or symbols on a dark background or dark characters or symbols on a light background.

407.3 Input Controls. At least one input control conforming to 407.3 shall be provided for each function.

EXCEPTION: Devices for personal use with input controls that are audibly discernable without activation and operable by touch shall not be required to conform to 407.3.

407.3.1 Tactilely Discernible. Input controls shall be operable by touch and tactilely discernible without activation.

407.3.2 Alphabetic Keys. Where provided, individual alphabetic keys shall be arranged in a QWERTY-based keyboard layout and the “F” and “J” keys shall be tactilely distinct from the other keys.

407.3.3 Numeric Keys. Where provided, numeric keys shall be arranged in a 12-key ascending or descending keypad layout. The number five key shall be tactilely distinct from the other keys. Where the ICT provides an alphabetic overlay on numeric keys, the relationships between letters and digits shall conform to ITU-T Recommendation E.161 (incorporated by reference, see 702.7.1).

407.4 Key Repeat. Where a keyboard with key repeat is provided, the delay before the key repeat feature is activated shall be fixed at, or adjustable to, 2 seconds minimum.

407.5 Timed Response. Where a timed response is required, the user shall be alerted visually, as well as by touch or sound, and shall be given the opportunity to indicate that more time is needed.

407.6 Operation. At least one mode of operation shall be operable with one hand and shall not require tight grasping, pinching, or twisting of the wrist. The force required to activate operable parts shall be 5 pounds (22.2 N) maximum.

407.7 Tickets, Fare Cards, and Keycards. Where tickets, fare cards, or keycards are provided, they shall have an orientation that is tactilely discernible if orientation is important to further use of the ticket, fare card, or keycard.

407.8 Reach Height and Depth. At least one of each type of operable part of stationary ICT shall be at a height conforming to 407.8.2 or 407.8.3 according to its position established by the vertical reference plane specified in 407.8.1 for a side reach or a forward reach. Operable parts used with speech output required by 402.2 shall not be the only type of operable part complying with 407.8 unless that part is the only operable part of its type.

407.8.1 Vertical Reference Plane. Operable parts shall be positioned for a side reach or a forward reach determined with respect to a vertical reference plane. The vertical reference plane shall be located in conformance to 407.8.2 or 407.8.3.

407.8.1.1 Vertical Plane for Side Reach. Where a side reach is provided, the vertical reference plane shall be 48 inches (1220 mm) long minimum.

407.8.1.2 Vertical Plane for Forward Reach. Where a forward reach is provided, the vertical reference plane shall be 30 inches (760 mm) long minimum.

407.8.2 Side Reach. Operable parts of ICT providing a side reach shall conform to 407.8.2.1 or 407.8.2.2. The vertical reference plane shall be centered on the operable part and placed at the leading edge of the maximum protrusion of the ICT within the length of the vertical reference plane. Where a side reach requires a reach over a portion of the ICT, the height of that portion of the ICT shall be 34 inches (865 mm) maximum.

407.8.2.1 Unobstructed Side Reach. Where the operable part is located 10 inches (255 mm) or less beyond the vertical reference plane, the operable part shall be 48 inches (1220 mm) high maximum and 15 inches (380 mm) high minimum above the floor.

407.8.2.2 Obstructed Side Reach. Where the operable part is located more than 10 inches (255 mm), but not more than 24 inches (610 mm), beyond the vertical reference plane, the height of the operable part shall be 46 inches (1170 mm) high maximum and 15 inches (380 mm) high minimum above the floor. The operable part shall not be located more than 24 inches (610 mm) beyond the vertical reference plane.

407.8.3 Forward Reach. Operable parts of ICT providing a forward reach shall conform to 407.8.3.1 or 407.8.3.2. The vertical reference plane shall be centered, and intersect with, the operable part. Where a forward reach allows a reach over a portion of the ICT, the height of that portion of the ICT shall be 34 inches (865 mm) maximum.

407.8.3.1 Unobstructed Forward Reach. Where the operable part is located at the leading edge of the maximum protrusion within the length of the vertical reference plane of the ICT, the operable part shall be 48 inches (1220 mm) high maximum and 15 inches (380 mm) high minimum above the floor.

407.8.3.2 Obstructed Forward Reach. Where the operable part is located beyond the leading edge of the maximum protrusion within the length of the vertical reference plane, the operable part shall conform to 407.8.3.2. The maximum allowable forward Start Printed Page 5839reach to an operable part shall be 25 inches (635 mm).

407.8.3.2.1 Operable Part Height for ICT with Obstructed Forward Reach. The height of the operable part shall conform to Table 407.8.3.2.1.

Table 407.8.3.2.1—Operable Part Height for ICT With Obstructed Forward Reach

REACH DEPTHOPERABLE PART HEIGHT
Less than 20 inches (510 mm)48 inches (1220 mm) maximum.
20 inches (510 mm) to 25 inches (635 mm)44 inches (1120 mm) maximum.

407.8.3.2.2 Knee and Toe Space under ICT with Obstructed Forward Reach. Knee and toe space under ICT shall be 27 inches (685 mm) high minimum, 25 inches (635 mm) deep maximum, and 30 inches (760 mm) wide minimum and shall be clear of obstructions.

EXCEPTIONS: 1. Toe space shall be permitted to provide a clear height of 9 inches (230 mm) minimum above the floor and a clear depth of 6 inches (150 mm) maximum from the vertical reference plane toward the leading edge of the ICT.

2. At a depth of 6 inches (150 mm) maximum from the vertical reference plane toward the leading edge of the ICT, space between 9 inches (230 mm) and 27 inches (685 mm) minimum above the floor shall be permitted to reduce at a rate of 1 inch (25 mm) in depth for every 6 inches (150 mm) in height.